IO1: Collection of case studies

Good / best / bad practices on how religion can act as a lever towards mental and physical health

        
 
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Title practice: Dementia, Religion and Spirituality
Short description of practice: This special issue of Dementia brings together three perspectives related to dementia care, religion, and spirituality; the diagnosed; the family caregiver; and the clinician. It is notable that a common message is found in all three perspectives. Specifically, issues of religion and spirituality must not be ignored in the dementia experience. Spirituality and religion are significant resources – across a wide spectrum of faith perspectives – for coping with a diagnosis of dementia
Authors: Jon C. Stuckey, Lisa P. Gwyther
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/14713012030023001
Reference: Stuckey, J. C., & Gwyther, L. P. (2003). Dementia, religion, and spirituality.


Title practice: Health Programs in Faith-Based Organizations Are They Effective
Short description of practice:

Research examines the published literature on health programs in faith-based organizations to determine the effectiveness of these programs.

Researchers conducted a systematic qualitative review of health-related databases for the years 1990 through 2000. Especially articles which describing faith-based health activities evaluated.

Authors: Mark J. DeHaven, Irby B. Hunter, Laura Wilder, James W. Walton, Jarett Berry
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.94.6.1030
Reference: DeHaven, M. J., Hunter, I. B., Wilder, L., Walton, J. W., & Berry, J. (2004). Health programs in faith-based organizations: are they effective?. American journal of public health, 94(6), 1030-1036.


Title practice: Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Mental Health Care, Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Short description of practice:

Religious coping is highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. Surveys indicate that 70–80% use religious or spiritual beliefs and activities to cope with daily difficulties and frustrations. Religion may help patients to enhance emotional adjustment and to maintain hope, purpose and meaning. Patients emphasize that serving a purpose beyond one ‘s self can make it possible to live with what might otherwise be unbearable. Programs successfully incorporating spirituality into clinical practice are described and discussed. Studies indicate that the outcome of psychotherapy in religious patients can be enhanced by integrating religious elements into the therapy protocol and that this can be successfully done by religious and non-religious therapists alike.

Authors: Rene Hefti
Country: Switzerland
Language: English
URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/2/4/611
Reference: Hefti, R. (2011). Integrating religion and spirituality into mental health care, psychiatry and psychotherapy. Religions, 2(4), 611-627.


Title practice: Placing Religion and Spirituality in End-of-Life Care
Short description of practice: This study has accelerated efforts to improve end-of-life care and has indirectly promoted a rapprochement among religion, spirituality, medicine, and health care. The goal of a quality comfortable death is achieved by meeting a patient's physical needs and by attending to the social, psychological, and the now recognized spiritual and religious dimensions of care. This perspective is highlighted in a recent consensus statement that includes the assessment and support of spiritual and religious well-being and management of spiritual and religious problems as core principles of professional practice and care at the end of life.
Authors: Timothy P. Daaleman, Larry VandeCreek
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/193261
Reference: Daaleman, T. P., & VandeCreek, L. (2000). Placing religion and spirituality in end-of-life care. Jama, 284(19), 2514-2517.


Title practice: Predictors of Preventive Health Care Use Among Middle-aged and Older Adults in Mexico The Role of Religion
Short description of practice: Research has shown that religion is associated with a wide range of health behaviors among adults of all ages. Although there is strong support for religion’s influence on behaviors such as drinking and smoking, less is known about the possible relationship between religion and the use of preventive health services. This relationship may be particularly important in Mexico, a country with high levels of religiousness and low levels of preventive service utilization. The findings show that religious salience is significantly related to the use of blood pressure and cholesterol screenings, even after controlling for a variety of social, demographic, and health-related factors.
Authors: Maureen R. Benjamins
Country: Latin America
Language: English
URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10823-007-9036-4
Reference: Benjamins, M. R. (2007). Predictors of preventive health care use among middle-aged and older adults in Mexico: The role of religion. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 22(2), 221-234.


Title practice: Religion and Health
Short description of practice: In this article researchers agreed that “appropriate spiritual support must be available to all patients who desire it, the same way we provide them with a meal and a warm blanket.” First, many clinicians practice in the biomedical model in which physical evidence is paramount and psychosocial and spiritual factors seem less relevant. Nevertheless, patient care is much more than disease management; it involves addressing the needs of the whole patient. Second, numerous studies have found that fewer physicians than patients describe themselves as religious or spiritual. Hence, physicians may underestimate the importance of spiritual matters to patients and may not share researchers view of spiritual support as a “basic need.” Third, this investigation questions what clinicians would do if studies of religious involvement demonstrated adverse health outcomes.
Authors: Candido J. Anaya
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(11)62007-7/pdf
Reference: Anaya, C. J. (2002, June). Religion and Health–2. In Mayo Clinic Proceedings (Vol. 77, No. 6, p. 600). Elsevier.


Title practice: Religion and Nurses Attitudes
Short description of practice: In this review of empirical studies, researcher aimed to assess the influence of religion and world view on nurses’ attitudes towards euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. Most identified studies showed a clear relationship between religion or world view and nurses’ attitudes towards euthanasia or physician assisted suicide.
Authors: Joris Gielen, Stef van den Branden and Bert Broeckaert
Country: Belgium
Language: English
URL: https://www.pastoralezorg.be/cms2/uploads/image/elisabeth/Gielen%20Religion%20and%20Nurses%20Attitudes%20to%20Euthanasia%20and%20Physician%20Assisted%20Suicide.pdf
Reference: Gielen, J., Van den Branden, S., & Broeckaert, B. (2009). Religion and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. Nursing Ethics, 16(3), 303-318.


Title practice: Religion and preventative health care utilization among the elderly
Short description of practice: The purpose of this paper is to overcome the gap in our knowledge by considering the effects of religious involvement on six different types of preventative health care (i.e. flu shots, cholesterol screening, breast self-exams, mammograms, pap smears, and prostrate screening) in a nationally representative sample. In pursuing this goal, the following steps occurred. First, researchers discussed the ways in which religion should affect health care use and the mechanisms that may account for that relationship. Next, they tested several hypotheses regarding these relationships using data from a sample of older adults. Evidence supporting a relationship between religion and physical health has increased substantially in the recent past.
Authors: Maureen Reindl Benjamins, Carolyn Brown
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0277953603001527
Reference: Benjamins, M. R., & Brown, C. (2004). Religion and preventative health care utilization among the elderly. Social Science & Medicine, 58(1), 109-118.


Title practice: Religion and Spirituality in the Lives of People with Serious Mental Illness
Short description of practice: In this research, religiousness is defined as participation in an institutionalized doctrine while spirituality is framed as an individual pursuit of meaning outside the world of immediate experience. In this study, 1,824 people with serious mental illness completed self-report measures of religiousness and spirituality. They also completed measures of three health outcome domains: self-perceived well-being, psychiatric symptoms, and life goal achievement. Results showed that both religiousness and spirituality were significantly associated with proxies of well-being and symptoms, but not of goal achievement. Implications of these findings for enhancing the lives of people with psychiatric disability are discussed.
Authors: Patrick Corrigan, Brian McCorkle, Bonnie Schell, and Kathryn Kidder
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/B:COMH.0000003010.44413.37#citeas
Reference: Corrigan, P., McCorkle, B., Schell, B. et al. Religion and Spirituality in the Lives of People with Serious Mental Illness. Community Ment Health J 39, 487–499 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1023/B:COMH.0000003010.44413.37


Title practice: Religion and Well Being in Aging Persons in an Aging Society
Short description of practice: This article reviews research findings on religion’s effects upon the well-being of older adults and addresses implications of these findings for interventions aimed at enhancing the wellbeing of aging persons. The paper concludes by suggesting that improvements in life quality for elders can have positive effects upon the well-being of the entire society by promoting understanding and acceptance of the meanings and lessons of aging.
Authors:
Country: Other
USA
Language: English
URL: https://spssi.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1540-4560.1995.tb01329.x
Reference: McFadden, S. H. (1995). Religion and well‐being in aging persons in an aging society. Journal of Social Issues, 51(2), 161-175.